Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Potential Causes of Toothaches: It's Not Always a Cavity

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Wendy J. Woudstra

No matter how conscientious you are about your oral care routine, at some point in your life you will probably experience the discomfort of a toothache. Though a cavity is the most likely culprit, it is only one of several possible causes of toothaches.

Tooth Sensitivity
If you are experiencing sharp pains when eating or drinking hot or cold foods, it could mean you have a cavity. It may also be a sign that you may have sensitive teeth, either from receding gums or from a thinning of your tooth enamel. While you are waiting for a dental appointment to confirm the cause of your sensitive teeth, using a soft-bristled toothbrush and a toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth may help ease the symptoms.

Some Toothaches Are More Severe
If the pain you are experiencing is a sharp, stabbing pain when you bite down on your food, the cause of your toothache could be a cavity or a cracked tooth. If it's a throbbing, incessant pain, on the other hand, you may have an abscessed tooth or an infection that should be taken care of as quickly as possible.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • It Might Not Even Be Your Teeth
  • See Your Dentist to Be Sure

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113
Houston, TX 77079
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Dealing With Dry Mouth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by the ADA

A healthy adult produces about three pints of saliva each day. It's not the kind of thing you would give thought to very often, but that saliva plays a very important role in maintaining your health.

Saliva serves many purposes. It contains enzymes that aid in digestion. Saliva makes it easier to talk, a fact recognized by those who experience stage fright and the associated dry mouth while giving a presentation. 

Saliva also helps prevent tooth decay by washing away food and debris from the teeth and gums. It neutralizes damaging acids, enhances the ability to taste food and makes it easier to swallow. Minerals found in saliva also help repair microscopic tooth decay. 

Everyone, at some time or another, experiences dry mouth, also called "xerostomia." It can happen when you are nervous, upset or under stress or as a result of medication you take or other medical therapies. If dry mouth happens all or most of the time, however, it can be uncomfortable - and it can have serious consequences for your oral health.

Drying irritates the soft tissues in the mouth, which can make them inflamed and more susceptible to infection. Without the cleansing effects of saliva, tooth decay and other oral health problems become much more common. 

Regular dental checkups are important. At each appointment, report any medications you are taking and other information about your health. An updated health history can help identify a cause for mouth dryness. 

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113
Houston, TX 77079
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Can I Help My Elderly Parent Brush Her Teeth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Can I Help My Elderly Parent Brush Her Teeth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Saturday, 10 June 2017

Experience Cleaner Teeth with Ultrasonic Dental Tools

The Cleanest Your Teeth Can Be

You can experience cleaner teeth with less scraping than from regular scaling instruments. The Cavitron Scaler™ is a high-frequency vibration (ultrasonic) tool that enables us to easily remove hard deposits. It works especially well under the gum-line and even into the deep pockets that can form around teeth, which is advantageous in the event that you need gum disease treatments. Many patients report that they experienced less discomfort with the Cavitron Scaler than with traditional instruments. Your teeth will never have felt so clean!

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

All About Cavities

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was Reviewed by the Faculty of Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

What's in Your Mouth? 
To understand what happens when your teeth decay, it's helpful to know what's in your mouth naturally. Here are a few of the elements: 

  • Saliva - Your mouth and teeth are constantly bathed in saliva. We never give much thought to our spit, but this fluid is remarkable for what it does to help protect our oral health. Saliva keeps teeth and other parts of your mouth moist and washes away bits of food. Saliva contains minerals that strengthen teeth. It includes buffering agents. They reduce the levels of acid that can decay teeth. Saliva also protects against some viruses and bacteria. 
  • Plaque - Plaque is a soft, gooey substance that sticks to the teeth a bit like jam sticks to a spoon. Like the slime that clings to the bottom of a swimming pool, plaque is a type of biofilm. It contains large numbers of closely packed bacteria, components taken from saliva, and bits of food. Also in the mix are bacterial byproducts and white blood cells. Plaque grows when bacteria attach to the tooth and begin to multiply. Plaque starts forming right after a tooth is cleaned. Within an hour, there's enough to measure. As time goes on, the plaque thickens. Within two to six hours, the plaque teems with bacteria that can cause cavities and periodontal (gum) disease. 
  • Calculus - If left alone long enough, plaque absorbs minerals from saliva. These minerals form crystals and harden into calculus. Then new plaque forms on top of existing calculus. This new layer can also become hard. 
  • Bacteria - We have many types of bacteria in our mouths. Some bacteria are good; they help control destructive bacteria. When it comes to decay, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli are the bacteria that cause the most damage to teeth. 

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • How Your Teeth Decay
  • Types of Decay
  • Preventing Cavities

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113
Houston, TX 77079
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Can I Get My Child to Brush Her Teeth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Can I Get My Child to Brush Her Teeth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Saturday, 3 June 2017

Smile Makeovers with Cosmetic Imaging

Cosmetic Imaging

As part of your treatment plan, you can see the end result before we start. Our cosmetic imaging program produces computer images of your teeth and gums, which can be shaped, replaced, added to, or lightened, demonstrating your future smile. Now you can see the new you even before the changes start!

Smiles of Memorial
Daniel Dernick, DDS
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113
Houston, TX 77079
(281) 493-0061
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Should I Clean and Store My Toothbrush?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Should I Clean and Store My Toothbrush?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Saturday, 27 May 2017

Regular Dental Care for Seniors

Senior Dental Care is Different

Just as our bodies slow and show the unmistakable signs of age, so do our teeth. Even your fillings, crowns, and bridge work can weaken, crack, or show excessive wear. Fortunately, with regular checkups, we can help you combat the more serious side effects. We offer treatments to reverse the dark staining caused by years of consuming acidic beverages or tobacco or by the buildup of plaque. Simple products are now available to alleviate the reduction of saliva caused by some medications. As we age, the potential hazards of gum disease and root decay increase. Daily cleaning and good nutrition, to maintain healthy gums, is even more critical for us as seniors. If you are experiencing red, irritated gums, bleeding, or your teeth start to feel loose, please contact us.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Friday, 19 May 2017

3 Things All Athletes Should Do for Their Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Dentist Dr. Thomas Long has seen firsthand what can happen when “the puck stops here.” In addition to seeing everyday athletes in his private practice, Dr. Long (a former college hockey player himself) is the team dentist for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes.

No matter what sport or skill level, Dr. Long says athletes need to take care of their teeth both on and off the field. “Most athletes are careful about what they eat and their workout routine. Part of that routine should include taking care of your mouth and teeth every single day,” he says. "It would be a shame to miss practice or a game because you are in the dentist's office receiving treatment or recovering from a dental surgical procedure.”

Here, Dr. Long shares his playbook for a healthy mouth. 

  • Make a Mouthguard Part of Your Uniform
  • Sideline Sugary Sports Drinks
  • Brush, Floss, Rinse, Repeat

To read the entire article, including more detailed information on the three steps listed in Dr. Long's playbook for a health mouth, please visit MouthHealthy.org.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Monday, 15 May 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Do Bad Teeth Run In the Family?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'Do Bad Teeth Run In the Family?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Smiles of Memorial
 
 
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Friday, 12 May 2017

Natural Teeth Whitening: Fact vs. Fiction

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

When it comes to teeth whitening, you may see many different methods featured online and in magazines-from oil pulling to charcoal, and even turmeric. It's no surprise that DIY whitening is top of mind, either. When the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry asked people what they’d most like to improve their smile, the most common response was whiter teeth. 
Healthy smiles come in many shades, though it's tempting to think ingredients in our own kitchens could hold the key to a brighter smile. Still, just because a method is natural doesn’t mean it’s healthy. In fact, DIY whitening can do more harm than good to your teeth. Here’s how:  

Fruits











Fiction:
The approach maintains you can make your teeth whiter and brighter household staples that are naturally acidic (like lemons, oranges, apple cider vinegar), contain digestive enzymes (such as pineapple or mango) and something that is abrasive (like baking soda).
Fact: 
When eaten as usual, fruit is a great choice. However, fruit and vinegar contain acid, and you put your pearly whites at risk when you prolong their contact with your teeth or use them to scrub your teeth because acid can wear away your enamel. Enamel is the thin outer coating of your teeth that protects you from tooth sensitivity and cavities. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article reveals fact vs. fiction for the following:

  • Scrubs
  • Spices and Oils
  • Still Interested in Whitening?

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Thursday, 11 May 2017

Comfortable Dental Care

No More "Fat Lips" or Numbness After Treatment!

Have you ever experienced that "fat-lip" feeling that comes from having your mouth numbed before treatment? The sensation can last for hours, making it hard to eat or even talk. Well, we say, NO MORE to "fat lips"! Instead, we offer our patients OraVerse™. After your treatment is complete, we can use OraVerse to reverse the effects of the anesthetic. It reduces the amount of time you're numb in half and then your mouth feels back to normal.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Friday, 5 May 2017

8 Non-Dairy, Calcium-Rich Foods for Your Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

Caring for your teeth means more than brushing and cleaning between them every day. It also means paying attention to the foods you eat. 

One of the most important nutrients for healthy teeth is calcium. Calcium strengthens the hard outer shell of your tooth called enamel, which is your teeth’s defense against erosion and cavities. To protect your teeth and get the 1,000-2,000 mg daily recommended amount of calcium, many people turn to dairy products like milk, cheese and yogurt. 

If you’re lactose intolerant or need to limit dairy, there are a number of foods that can still give you the calcium you need. Calcium is found naturally in some foods, while others - such as juice, tofu and even waffles - are now fortified with added calcium. 

Here are some non-dairy options from the USDA Food Composition Database to help keep your body and smile strong.

Orange Juice with Added Calcium

Oranges naturally have a bit of calcium, but many varieties of orange juice (already a top source of vitamin C) now come fortified with calcium. For example, frozen orange juice from concentrate with added calcium contains 1514 mg of calcium per cup. That’s your daily recommendation in just one glass! Juice, however, can be high in sugar, so drink it in moderation.  If your child drinks juice, make sure to serve the recommended, age-appropriate limits.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article highlights 7 over non-dairy, calcium-rich foods that are good for your teeth:

  • Whey Powder
  • Tofu with Added Calcium
  • Canned Fish
  • Beans
  • Almonds
  • Leafy Green Vegetables
  • Soymilk

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Thursday, 4 May 2017

Gum Disease Treatments

There Is Good News

Surgical treatment may be necessary for advanced gum disease. Gum surgery is never fun, but it is almost always successful in controlling the condition, and common insurance plans usually cover a portion of it. With mild periodontal disease, there are very effective NON-surgical procedures that, coupled with improved dental hygiene, can virtually halt the spread of the disease. This, too, is usually partially covered under most dental insurance plans.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Monday, 1 May 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Should I Pull Out My Child’s Loose Tooth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'Should I Pull Out My Childís Loose Tooth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Thursday, 27 April 2017

Dental Teeth Whitening

Whiter Teeth Equate to an Amazing Smile!

Restore the brilliant white to your smile in just one visit. With our in-office power whitening treatment, it's possible to remove years of staining and discoloration caused by beverages, tobacco use, or the side effects of certain medications. The results of our professional bleaching process can last for years! We also offer custom whitening trays made in our own lab. You receive supplies and instructions, allowing you to safely and effectively whiten at home. Results occur within 1 - 14 days.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Monday, 24 April 2017

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month


April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month
Oral cancer can be fatal. But if detected early, it has a fantastic cure rate.
Get your painless oral cancer screening today! Ask your dentist for an oral cancer screening.
It could save your life!


Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Mouth-Healthy Eating

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was Reviewed by the Faculty of Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

If you want to prevent cavities, how often you eat can be just as important as what you eat. That's because food affects your teeth and mouth long after you swallow. Eating cookies with dinner will do less harm to your teeth than eating them as a separate snack. Of course, overall poor nutrition can contribute to periodontal (gum) disease. It also can have other long-term effects on your mouth. Learning how food affects your oral health is the first step toward mouth-healthy eating.

Immediate Effects of Food

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. Bacteria in your mouth make acids. The acids start the process that can lead to cavities.

How does this happen?
All carbohydrate foods eventually break down into simple sugars: glucose, fructose, maltose and lactose. Fermentable carbohydrates break down in the mouth. Other foods don't break down until they move further down the digestive tract.

Fermentable carbohydrates work with bacteria to form acids that begin the decay process and eventually destroy teeth. They include the obvious sugary foods, such as cookies, cakes, soft drinks and candy. But they also include less obvious foods, such as bread, crackers, bananas and breakfast cereals.

Certain bacteria on your teeth use the sugars from these foods and produce acids. The acids dissolve minerals inside the tooth enamel. The process is called demineralization. Teeth also can regain minerals. This natural process is called remineralization. Saliva helps minerals to build back up in teeth. So do fluoride and some foods.

Dental decay begins inside the tooth enamel when minerals are being lost faster than they are being regained.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • more information on the Immediate Effects of food
  • information on the Long-Term Effects of food
  • information on What to Eat

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Monday, 17 April 2017

Your Dentist and Hygienist are your First Line of Defense


Your Dentist and Hygienist are your First Line of Defense
Who else ever examines the inside of your mouth this closely?
Oral cancer can be fatal. But if detected early the cure rate is astounding.
Ask your dentist for a painless oral cancer screening today.
It could save your life.


Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Saturday, 15 April 2017

Nutrition Tips: How to Eat Healthy

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Yolanda Eddis

Healthy eating is essential for your overall health. Choosing foods and beverages that provide the right amount of energy and nutrients goes a long way toward maintaining not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mouth. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer numerous nutrition resources, such as sample recipes, menus and educational tools that will guide you in picking out the right foods and drinks to consume. By knowing how to eat healthy, you can improve your physical and oral health, prevent disease and promote healthy growth and development for children and adolescents.

What Is a Nutritious Diet?

Eating a nutritious diet has many benefits. A well-balanced diet should include foods from the basic food groups and subgroups along with the right oils. Nutrients such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals are a staple of healthy diets, but it's also important to avoid eating too many or too few nutrients.

In an effort to assist consumers to learn how to eat healthy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture developed the MyPlate website. MyPlate illustrates the five food groups, which include fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins and dairy, and provides several examples of each. Oils that come from different plants and fish are also recommended although they don't constitute a food group of their own. The selection of foods from these groups can be fresh, canned, frozen or dried. The site also recommends different ways to balance your caloric intake by increasing nutrients and decreasing the consumption of sugar and sodium in meals and snacks.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • How to Select Healthy Beverages
  • Healthy Habits after Eating and Drinking
  • Healthy Eating Tips
  • Diet and Dental Health

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Friday, 14 April 2017

How Tooth Whitening Works

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about teeth whitening in their video on 'How Tooth Whitening Works.'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Monday, 10 April 2017

Oral Cancer Screening


Oral cancer is a killer. Thousands die from it every year.
Don’t be one of them.
Ask your dentist for a painless oral cancer screening today!
It could save your life.


Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Gum Disease Linked to Heath Problems

Gum Disease Can Contribute to Serious Health Conditions

Recent medical research has found a startling connection between periodontal (gum) disease, stroke, and heart disease. Since heart disease can be fatal, that makes gum disease a more serious matter than previously understood. The American Dental Association estimates that as many as 8 out of 10 Americans have periodontal disease. If this were any other affliction, such as AIDS or tuberculosis, it would be considered an epidemic! Many dentists treat it as just that. They used to believe that gum disease would never be considered that way because "no one ever dies from it." The worst is that you lose your teeth. Not pleasant - but certainly not life threatening. But that's all changed. 

The American Academy of Periodontology reports that "Studies found periodontal infection may contribute to the development of heart disease, increase the risk of premature, underweight births, and pose a serious threat to people whose health is already compromised due to diabetes and respiratory diseases." Periodontal disease is characterized by bacterial infection of the gums. These bacteria can travel into the bloodstream - straight to the heart.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Saturday, 8 April 2017

Diet, Food Choices and Healthy Gums

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by the ADA 

Can food or drink choices help a person have healthier gums?

Japanese researchers studied a group of nearly 950 adults to determine whether consuming dairy products with lactic acid like milk, yogurt and cheese, had a lower risk for gum disease.

Participants' periodontal health was evaluated through two measurements - periodontal pocket depth and clinical attachment loss of gum tissue. Researchers found that participants who consumed 55 grams or more each day of yogurt or lactic acid drinks had significantly lower instance of periodontal disease. They found that consuming milk or cheese was not as beneficial to periodontal health.

Researchers theorize that the probiotic effect of Lactobacillus bacteria could be related to healthier gums. Another Japanese study showed that adults who drank green tea might also lead to healthier gums, because its antioxidants have anti - inflammatory properties.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Friday, 7 April 2017

Pregnancy and Newborn Oral Health

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about 'Pregnancy and Newborn Oral Health.'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Monday, 3 April 2017

Sedation Dentistry using Nitrous Oxide

Nitrous Oxide Sedation

Breathe in—breathe out, repeat—relax! Laughing gas, the more commonly known name for nitrous oxide sedation, makes treatment more comfortable. Inhaled through an over-the-nose mask, nitrous oxide medication induces a state of relaxation, which allows local anesthetic to be administered without pain. Now you don't have to fear the needle!

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Friday, 31 March 2017

Get Wise About Wisdom Teeth

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about wisdom teeth in their video titled 'Get Wise About Wisdom Teeth.'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Monday, 27 March 2017

Dental Porcelain Veneers

'Smile Makeovers' in as Few as Two Visits!

Do you have a less-than-perfect smile - crooked teeth, unsightly gaps, or odd discolorations? We may have the solution for which you've been searching. Our porcelain veneers are made from the most advanced dental ceramic available and colored to blend seamlessly with your other teeth. Extremely thin and hard, veneers are bonded to your teeth in a way that makes them appear straight and uniform, creating an attractive smile. In as few as two visits, your misshapen, chipped, cracked, or worn teeth can be painlessly altered to appear close to perfect. Crooked teeth can look like they've had years of straightening! Ask us if veneers are right for you.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS 
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113 
Houston, TX 77079 
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

Travel Tips for Your Teeth: Emergencies

In Case of Emergency...
Have your dentist’s contact info handy in your cell phone or keep a business card in your wallet. “If you think you need to talk to somebody, you probably do,” Dr. Messina says. In fact, more dental emergencies can be resolved over the phone than you might think (especially if you keep up regular visits). “As a patient, it’s hard to know the difference between something that needs to be treated right away and something that can wait until you get home,” he says. “That’s what we are here for.”

In Case of Emergency Overseas...
If you are out of the country and absolutely in need of a dentist, Dr. Messina recommends getting in touch with the local consulate or U.S. embassy. “While talking to the concierge at the hotel is OK, ask the consulate and their employees for a recommendation,” he says. “It’s an independent recommendation and not someone who may be driving business because of a contract or to a relative.”

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Travel Tips for Your Teeth: Toothbrush

Forget Your Toothbrush?
Sunscreen? Check. Phone charger? Check. Toothbrush? Oops. If you find yourself temporarily without a toothbrush, Dr. Messina says you can rinse vigorously with water to wash away some of that cavity-causing bacteria. You could also put some toothpaste on a clean washcloth or your clean finger in a pinch. When you finally get to the nearest drugstore, look for a toothbrush with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. If there aren’t any Seal products, buy the softest brush you can find.

Proper Toothbrush Transport
Letting your toothbrush air dry is how you keep your toothbrush clean at home, but that’s not always possible on vacation. What’s a traveling toothbrush to do? “I’m a big fan of resealable plastic bags. Keeping your toothbrush clean and out of contact with other things is more important that making sure it’s dry on vacation,” Dr. Messina says. “A bag keeps your toothbrush separate from everything else in your luggage. When you get there, pop it open and let your brush air dry.”

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com 

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Travel Tips for Your Teeth

Pack an ADA-Accepted Pack of Gum 
Chewing sugarless gum can help relieve ear pressure during a flight ñ and help keep cavities at bay on vacay. Research shows that chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after a meal can help prevent cavities. That’s because it gets saliva flowing, which helps wash away cavity-causing bacteria. Sugarless gum with the ADA Seal is guaranteed to do the trick.

When In Doubt, Brush with Bottled Water 
If you are in a country where the water supply is compromised - or you’re on a wilderness adventure but aren’t sure how clean the stream is - always use bottled water to brush. “Don’t use the local water to brush your teeth,” Dr. Messina says. What happens if you accidentally get local water on your toothbrush? “Get a new one if you can,” he says. “If that isn’t possible, rinse your brush well with bottled water to reduce the risk of getting sick.”

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Smiles of Memorial  
Daniel Dernick, DDS  
909 Dairy Ashford Rd #113  
Houston, TX 77079  
(281) 493-0061 
SmilesofMemorial.com